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H.R. 423 Death March Compensation Act

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let us run with endurance the race that is set before us Hebrews 12:1

BATAAN DEATH MARCH COMPENSATION BILL (H.R.423 by Rep Mica)

 

Source: http://www.thomas.gov

 

Samuel B. Moody Bataan Death March Compensation Act (Introduced in House)

HR 423 IH

111th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 423

To provide compensation for certain World War II veterans who survived the Bataan Death March and were held as prisoners of war by the Japanese.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

January 9, 2009

Mr. MICA introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Armed Services


A BILL

To provide compensation for certain World War II veterans who survived the Bataan Death March and were held as prisoners of war by the Japanese.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the `Samuel B. Moody Bataan Death March Compensation Act'.

SEC. 2. PAYMENT TO WORLD WAR II VETERANS WHO SURVIVED BATAAN DEATH MARCH.

(a) In General- The Secretary of the military department concerned shall pay, upon request, to an individual described in subsection (b) the amount determined with respect to that individual under subsection (c).

(b) Covered Individuals- A payment under subsection (a) shall be made to any individual who as a member of the Armed Forces during World War II--

(1) was captured on the peninsula of Bataan or island of Corregidor in the territory of the Philippines by Japanese forces; and

(2) participated in and survived the Bataan Death March.

(c) Amount To Be Paid- The amount of a payment under subsection (a) to an individual shall be $4 for each day during which the individual was held in captivity by Japanese forces during World War II, compounded annually at a 3 percent annual rate of interest.

(d) Payment to Survivors- In the case of an individual described in subsection (b) who is deceased, payment under this section with respect to that individual shall be made to that individual's nearest surviving relative, as determined by the Secretary concerned.

 

 

HR 1570 IH

110th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 1570

To provide compensation for certain World War II veterans who survived the Bataan Death March and were held as prisoners of war by the Japanese.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

March 19, 2007

Mr. MICA introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Armed Services


A BILL

To provide compensation for certain World War II veterans who survived the Bataan Death March and were held as prisoners of war by the Japanese.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the `Samuel B. Moody Bataan Death March Compensation Act'.

SEC. 2. PAYMENT TO WORLD WAR II VETERANS WHO SURVIVED THE BATAAN DEATH MARCH.

(a) In General- The Secretary of the military department concerned shall pay, upon request, to an individual described in subsection (b) the amount determined with respect to that individual under subsection (c).

(b) Covered Individuals- A payment under subsection (a) shall be made to any individual who as a member of the Armed Forces during World War II--

(1) was captured on the peninsula of Bataan or island of Corregidor in the territory of the Philippines by Japanese forces; and

(2) participated in and survived the Bataan Death March.

(c) Amount To Be Paid- The amount of a payment under subsection (a) to an individual shall be $4 for each day during which the individual was held in captivity by Japanese forces during World War II, compounded annually at a 3 percent annual rate of interest.

(d) Payment to Survivors- In the case of an individual described in subsection (b) who is deceased, payment under this section with respect to that individual shall be made to that individual's nearest surviving relative, as determined by the Secretary concerned.

109th CONGRESS
1st Session

H. R. 30

To provide compensation for certain World War II veterans who survived the Bataan Death March and were held as prisoners of war by the Japanese.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

January 4, 2005

Mr. MICA (for himself, Mr. SIMMONS, Mr. STEARNS, Mr. WELDON of Pennsylvania, Mr. CUNNINGHAM, and Mr. HUNTER) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Armed Services


A BILL

To provide compensation for certain World War II veterans who survived the Bataan Death March and were held as prisoners of war by the Japanese.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the `Samuel B. Moody Bataan Death March Compensation Act'.

SEC. 2. PAYMENT TO WORLD WAR II VETERANS WHO SURVIVED BATAAN DEATH MARCH.

    (a) In General- The Secretary of the military department concerned shall pay, upon request, to an individual described in subsection (b) the amount determined with respect to that individual under subsection (c).

    (b) Covered Individuals- A payment under subsection (a) shall be made to any individual who as a member of the Armed Forces during World War II--

      (1) was captured on the peninsula of Bataan or island of Corregidor in the territory of the Philippines by Japanese forces; and

      (2) participated in and survived the Bataan Death March.

    (c) Amount to Be Paid- The amount of a payment under subsection (a) to an individual shall be $4 for each day during which the individual was held in captivity by Japanese forces during World War II, compounded annually at a 3 percent annual rate of interest.

    (d) Payment to Surviving Spouse- In the case of an individual described in subsection (b) who is deceased and who has an unremarried surviving spouse, payment under this section with respect to that individual shall be made to the unremarried surviving spouse. If there is no unremarried surviving spouse, no payment shall be made under this section with respect to that individual.

END


May 11, 2000

SAMUEL B. MOODY BATAAN DEATH MARCH ACT

 
Mr. MICA. Mr. Speaker, today I am introducing legislation in the name of a special and dear friend who valiantly served in World War II and survived the treacherous Bataan Death March. The ``Samuel B. Moody Bataan Death March Compensation Act'' would provide compensation to those individuals who were forced to partake and held imprisoned following the ruthless procession.

Last year, Sam Moody passed away in Central Florida. I first met Sam in my civic activities in central Florida some years ago. However, I never really knew much about his background until some years ago when I invited Sam and several other veteran leaders to a small luncheon gathering.

As we sat together, I asked each of the veterans to relate some of their military service recollections after lunch to our group. Sam Moody started off rather hesitantly but he began telling an incredible story.

In 1942, American and Filipino troops fought bravely against the Japanese army during the Second World War on the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines. Due to the low supplies and no hope of reinforcements, these men fought valiantly until they were forced to surrender to the enemy.

Within six days, the troops were corralled in the Mariveles, just south of Bataan. Little did they know, they were in for the journey of their lives--the Bataan Death March. In April of 1942 they began their march from Mariveles to their yet unknown destination of San Fernando--more than 60 miles away. The tropical temperatures in the Philippines during this season were excruciating, many men dying from dehydration and some from exhaustion. Treatment by their Japanese captors was brutal and often fatal as those who could not continue marching were summarily beaten or executed on the spot.

 

Many marchers attempted to escape into the jungles and some succeeded, however, most were forced to continue on their journey. Once they reached the railroad sidings, the troops were crammed into railroad cars like cattle. They continued to feel the torture of the tropical sun and their 30 mile train journey took close to 4 hours with long stops at various points.

After reaching camp O'Donnel in the jungles of Arlac Province, these soldiers were held as prisoners of war for over 3 1/2 years.

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of the ``Samuel B. Moody Bataan Death March Compensation Act'' is to illustrate that while food and clothing allowances existed for our soldiers the United States failed to pay these benefits to the Bataan Death March survivors during their time spent in captivity.

In fact, those who survived to see their liberation in 1945 also did not receive the promotions or pay grade increases given to their counterparts who were not held as POWs. Pay increases and benefits were a standard part of military service, however, these brave individuals have yet to receive their lost payment.

In an effort to give these brave men their just benefits, I am introducing this legislation to compensate those survivors who were held captive after the Bataan Death March with their earned pay and benefits.

I would like to invite each member of this body to join me in this effort by cosponsoring this legislation. For those who gave so much in service to our Nation deserve to be duly compensated for their sacrifice and valor.

 

June 30, 1999

TRIBUTE TO SAMUEL BARNES MOODY

 

Mr. MICA. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to a good friend and great American, Mr. Samuel Barnes Moody. Sam Moody, who was my very special friend and was very special to me personally, was born on June 2, 1920.

Last week, Sam Moody passed away in central Florida. I first met Sam Moody in my civic activities in central Florida some years ago. However, I never really knew much about his background until some years ago when I invited Sam and several other veteran leaders to a small luncheon gathering.

As we sat together, I asked each of the veterans to relate some of their military service recollections after lunch to our group. Sam Moody started off rather hesitantly but he began telling an incredible story.

Let me say a little bit about Sam Moody. He joined the old Army Air Corps on November 15, 1940. After his basic training, he was shipped out to Manila in the Philippines where he arrived on Thursday Thanksgiving Day, 1941. Some 18 days later, World War II broke out. Sam Moody and his group found themselves on Bataan and eventually they ran out of food and supplies in April of 1942.

Sam went on to tell the story that on April 9, 1942, he and more than a thousand others took part in the famous Bataan Death March. Over 10,000 men, women and children died. Somehow God spared Sam Moody.

He was then cast on a ship, a transport. This story is relayed in his autobiography from this event entitled Reprieve From Hell, and I strongly recommend that to every American, particularly every young American. In this transport, hundreds of other Americans were crammed into the hull of a ship that was torpedoed by an American submarine. Many, many, many died. Somehow Sam survived. God spared Sam Moody.

 

Also as a prisoner of war, Sam Moody served under incredible conditions when he arrived in Japan, under torturous and malnutrition conditions, along with hundreds and hundreds of others. Of 36,000 American servicemen, less than 10 percent survived, but somehow God spared Sam Moody.

In 1946, after his release and return home, Sam Moody went back to Japan to testify for the American government at the International War Crimes trial. Sam was probably the only enlisted survivor to testify in these trials to help bring justice to those who had killed and tortured so many.

At these trials, Sam Moody met Madeleine, who was working for General MacArthur. They married and have two wonderful children, Betty and Steve.

Sergeant Sam Moody leaves behind a wonderful family, to whom I extend my very deepest sympathy. Sergeant Sam Moody also leaves behind a record of incredible service and devotion to our Nation and a country he dearly loved.

Sam Moody also leaves behind an incredible record of his service and survival from World War II and the Bataan Death March, which I recommend again to every Member of Congress and every American. It is called Reprieve From Hell.

Sam Moody went to be with his Maker last week. We will miss him.

 

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